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Timetable (CGPW01)

Post-grad ASI in mathematical and physical sciences: experimental, modelling, numerical analysis and applications

Monday 13th July 2015 to Friday 24th July 2015

Monday 13th July 2015
09:00 to 09:35 Registration
09:35 to 09:45 John Toland (University of Cambridge); (University of Bath); (Isaac Newton Institute)
Welcome from John Toland (INI Director)
INI 1
09:45 to 10:30 Anotida Madzvamuse (University of Sussex)
Models for growth development in cell motility and pattern formation
The aim of this lecture is stimulate discussions on the development of new theoretical and computational models coupling internal (bulk), surface and external (extra-cellular matrix) dynamics for cell motility and pattern formation. Underpinning this framework are numerous open problems associated with analysis of the models, development of efficient and robust numerical methods as well as fitting models (qualitatively and quantitatively) to experimental observations (data) through optimal control models.
INI 1
10:30 to 10:45 Morning Coffee
10:45 to 11:45 Hans Othmer (University of Minnesota)
A Theoretician's Overview of Some Basic Problems in the Modelling and Analysis of Cell Motility
INI 1
11:45 to 12:30 Group Discusssion INI 1
12:30 to 13:30 Lunch at Wolfson Court
13:30 to 14:30 Ewa Paluch
Actin cortex mechanics in cell migration without focal adhesions
The shape of animal cells is primarily determined by the cellular cortex, a thin network of actin filaments and myosin motors that lies directly underneath the plasma membrane. Cell shape changes are driven by controlled changes in the physical properties of the cortex, which arise from the microscopic architecture, composition and dynamics of the cortical network. We investigate how the mechanical properties of the cortex are controlled at the molecular level, and how changes in these properties drive cell deformation. We have developed methods to investigate the spatial organisation of the cortex at the microscopic scale and are exploring how network organisation and the spatial distribution of motor proteins determine cortical tension. A precise spatial control of cortex tension and contractility is essential during cell shape changes. For example, during cell migration, contractility gradients towards the back of the cell have been involved in promoting cell polarization and the forward movement of the cell body. We are studying the control and function of cortical contractile tension during bleb-based migration of non adherent cells in 3-dimensional confinement. We could show that in such cells, a sustained rearward cortical flow is sufficient to drive persistent cell motion in confinement, even in the absence of specific substrate adhesions. We show that the non-adherent cells use a friction-based migration mechanism, which relies on forces several orders of magnitude smaller than adhesion-based migration. Such focal adhesion-independent locomotion may be advantageous for cells crossing multiple tissues, as it does not require the expression of tissue-specific receptors. Related Links
INI 1
14:30 to 15:30 Bernd Hoffmann (Forschungszentrum Jülich)
Migration of epithelial cells
Epithelial cells play a vital role for mechanical integrity at the tissue level by forming a stable cell layer that is connected to the extracellular environment via various cell-cell as well as cell-matrix junctions. However, upon signal induction cells can undergo dramatic morphological changes to switch from a sessile to a highly motile phenotype. Characterized by intense cell polarization a concerted interplay at the level of cytoskeletal dynamics, cell adhesion, force generation, and protein affinity regulation takes place leading to an overall uniform migratory behavior. Although hundreds of molecules and regulatory events are involved, four main steps, namely I) actin polymerization at the cell front, II) adhesion formation, III) cell contraction and IV) de-adhesion at the rear end of the cell characterize the complete motility cycle of epithelial cells making epithelial cells to an ideal model system in order to study basic cell motility events.
INI 1
15:30 to 16:00 Afternoon Tea
16:00 to 17:00 Group Discussion INI 1
17:00 to 18:00 Welcome Wine Reception
19:00 to 20:00 InCem Come Together
Tuesday 14th July 2015
09:00 to 10:00 Alex Mogilner (New York University)
Design principles of actin lamellipodial treadmill: lessons from the fragment
Co-authors: N Ofer (Technion), D Ben Aroush (Technion), J Allard (UC Irvine), E Abu Shah (Technion), K Keren (Technion)
Actin turnover/treadmill is the central driver of cell migration. Though biochemical players enabling actin treadmill are known, its quantitative understanding is lacking. We focused on lamellipodial fragments form fish keratocytes lacking cell body but retaining the ability to migrate. The geometric simplicity of fragments and the absence of organelles and complex actin structures allowed us to characterize quantitatively the spatial actin organization in motile fragments. We used fluorescent microscopy to measure distributions of actin filaments and monomers, as well as the distributions of barbed ends and pointed ends. We then combined the actin mapping with mathematical modeling and FRAP to understand the organization of the actin turnover and treadmill. We found that more than half of actin is not part of the rapidly turning over F-actin network but is a diffusing fraction of oligomers and monomers, most of which is not available for polymerization. Modeling suggests that such organization of the actin treadmill enables diffusion to recycle actin effectively and makes cell migration steady, yet prepared for rapid focused acceleration.
INI 1
10:00 to 10:30 Morning Coffee
10:30 to 11:30 Samuel Safran (Weizmann Institute of Science)
Physical theories of cell mechanics
Co-authors: Ohad Cohen (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel), Kinjal Dasbiswas (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel), Xinpeng Xu (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel)      
Cell contractility at either the coarse-grained level of an entire cell or at the sub-cellular level of individual acto-myosin fibers, can be understood using the concept of elastic force dipoles. These dipoles interact via their mutual deformations of the surrounding visco-elastic medium which can be either the extra-cellular matrix (in the case of cells modeled as force dipoles)  or the internal, cellular cytoskeleton (in the case of acto-myosin fibers within the cell). The theory of these elastically mediated interactions combined with the unique "living" nature of cells (implying that the activity of these dipoles is non-equilibrium and energy consuming) allows us to understand the organization and order of acto-myosin fibers within the cytoskeleton of a single cell or among contractile cells in systems of non-motile and adherent cells. We present the general theory of elastic interactions in the context of acto-myosin activity with examples that demonstrate its utility in understanding experiments on cytoskeletal alignment in stem cells that differentiate  into muscle cells, the structure and beating of cardiomyocytes, very long-ranged cell-cell interactions in fibrous elastic matrices, and elastically controlled diffusion of biomolecules that trigger development in embryos.
Related Links
INI 1
11:30 to 12:30 Group Discussion INI 1
12:30 to 13:30 Lunch at Wolfson Court
13:30 to 14:30 Till Bretschneider (University of Warwick)
Actin dynamics in Dictyostelium
Dictyostelium discoideum is one of only ten non-mammalian model organisms for biomedical research officially supported by the NIH. Above all this has to do with Dictyostelium being a genetically very tractable organism in general, but particularly in terms of cell migration, signalling to the actin cytoskeleton is remarkably conserved between Dictyostelium and mammalian leukocytes. Furthermore, few other organisms have been studied so extensively regarding theoretical aspects of cell migration. I will review the biology of signalling to the actin cytoskeleton in Dictyostelium, highlighting the role of self-organisation and excitability of the actin system in the formation of functional dynamic structures in the absence of external signals. I will conclude with recent work on image-based modelling of cell reorientation and blebbing. Related Links
INI 1
14:30 to 15:30 Alexander Bershadsky (Weizmann Institute of Science)
Self-organizatin of the actin cytoskeleton

We discuss here some aspects of local and global self-organization of the actomyosin cytoskeleton in the fibroblast-type cells. (1) Locally, the cytoplasm comprises a multi-nodal network formed by small asters of actin filaments nucleated by DAAM1 formin and stabilized by the actin crosslinking protein filamin A. The asters are connected with each other by myosin II, so that the entire system forms a contractile network responsible for the maintenance of the cell shape. (2) Observations of the assembly of myosin-II filament arrays by structured illumination microscopy (SIM) revealed myosin-II “stacks” formed by alignment in register of the myosin-II bipolar filaments associated with actin fibers. In the cells spread over the planar substrate, the numerous myosin stacks apparently form the links between neighboring actin filament bundles (stress-fibers or arcs), maintaining the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. (3) Globally, upon spreading on planar substrate s, cells develop chiral arrays of actin filament bundles. In fibroblasts confined to the circular adhesive islands, a radially symmetrical system of actin bundles, consisting of alpha-actinin-enriched radial fibers (RFs) and myosin-IIA-enriched transverse fibers (TFs), evolved spontaneously into the chiral system as a result of the unidirectional tilting of all RFs accompanied by a tangential shift in the retrograde movement of TFs. The handedness of the chiral pattern is regulated by alpha-actinin-1. Experimental observations together with computational modeling, demonstrated how the interactions between RFs nucleated by formins and contractile TFs could result in the transition of the actin pattern from radial to chiral, left-right asymmetric organization. Thus, actin cytoskeleton self-organization provides built-in machinery that potentially allows cells to develop left-right asymmetry. Such actin-based mechanism could underlie the development of left-right asymmetry in tissues and embryos. Related Links:
INI 1
15:30 to 16:00 Afternoon Tea
16:00 to 17:00 Group Discussion INI 1
Wednesday 15th July 2015
09:00 to 10:15 Leah Edelstein-Keshet (University of British Columbia); (University of British Columbia)
Models of cell polarization and motility
INI 1
10:15 to 10:45 Morning Coffee
10:45 to 12:00 Raymond Goldstein (University of Cambridge)
How a Volvox embryo turns itself inside out
During the growth of daughter colonies of the multicellular alga Volvox the spherical embryos must turn themselves inside out to complete their development. This process of 'inversion' has many features in common with gastrulation, the process by which an initially convex spherical shell of animal cells develops an invagination, leading to the formation of a gastric system. In both cases it is understood that cell shape changes play a major role in guiding the process, but quantification of the dynamics, and formulation of a mathematical description of the process, have been lacking. In this talk I will describe advances my group has made recently on both fronts. Using the technique of SPIM (selective plane illumination microscopy) we have obtained the first real-time three-dimensional time-lapse movies of inversion in Volvox, using several species displaying distinct morphological events. The beginnings of an elastic theory of these processes will also be described.
INI 1
12:00 to 12:30 Group Discussion
12:30 to 13:30 Lunch at Wolfson Court
13:30 to 14:45 Reinhard Windoffer (RWTH Aachen University)
The dynamic cytoskeleton
INI 1
14:45 to 15:15 Afternoon Tea
15:15 to 16:30 Rudolf Leube (RWTH Aachen University)
Adhesions in epithelial cell migration
Collective cell migration is characteristic for epithelial cells requiring not only reversible attachment to the extracellular matrix but also continued cell-to-cell cohesion of the entire epithelial sheet. The different types of adhesive functions have been linked to morphologically and functionally distinct multimolecular complexes, which physically couple to the cytoskeleton and act as signaling centers. We will first describe the different types of adhesion sites that are characteristically encountered in epithelial tissues and present selected examples of human diseases linked to perturbation of these sites. Emphasis will be on the plasticity of the different junction types and their cross-talk with each other and other cellular elements. Finally, questions regarding modulation and function of the different adhesion modes will be discussed in the context of epithelial cell migration.
INI 1
16:30 to 17:00 Group Discussion INI 1
19:30 to 22:00 Conference Dinner at Emmanuel College
Thursday 16th July 2015
09:00 to 10:15 Luigi Preziosi (Politecnico di Torino)
Multiscale Modelling of Cell-ECM interaction
Cell-extracellular matrix interaction and the mechanical properties of cell nucleus have been demonstrated to play a fundamental role in cell movement across fibre networks and micro-channels. In the talk, we will describe several mathematical models dealing with such a problem, starting from modelling cell adhesion mechanics to the inclusion of influence of nucleus stiffness in the motion of cells. An energetic approach is used in order to obtain a necessary condition for which cells enter cylindrical structures. The nucleus of the cell is treated either (i) as an elastic membrane surrounding a liquid droplet or (ii) as an incompressible elastic material with Neo-Hookean constitutive equation. The results obtained highlight the importance of the interplay between mechanical deformability of the nucleus and the capability of the cell to establish adhesive bonds.
INI 1
10:15 to 10:45 Morning Coffee
10:45 to 12:00 Yoichiro Mori (University of Minnesota)
Osmosis, Electrophysiology and Cell Movement
Water movement in the biological tissue is controlled primarily by osmosis, and the primary osmolytes are ions (Na, K, Cl etc). It is then natural to think that electrophysiology is in some way related to cell movement. This indeed seems to be the case; there is mounting evidence that ion channels and aquaporins play an important role in cell movement. In this talk, we will first review some classical facts about electrophysiology, focusing on its role in cell volume control. We will also discuss the classical subject of fluid secretion/absorption in epithelial systems, and compare this with recent work on a mode of cell movement that seems to be predominantly osmotic. We will then present a mathematical framework that couples electrophysiology, osmosis and cell mechanics in a natural way that allows for the study of this interplay. We will show preliminary 2D computational results of a deforming model cell moving using osmotic forces.
INI 1
12:00 to 12:30 Group Discussion INI 1
12:30 to 13:30 Lunch at Wolfson Court
13:30 to 14:45 Rudolf Merkel (Forschungszentrum Jülich); (Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn)
Mechanobiology of cells
INI 1
14:45 to 15:15 Afternoon Tea
15:15 to 16:30 Anne Ridley (King's College London)
Cell Motility and Signalling to the Cytoskeleton
Cells move in response to extracellular cues in their environment. Cell motility is driven by the cytoskeleton, principally actin filaments and microtubules. Rho family GTPases are intracellular signal transducers that coordinate cell motility through their effects on the cytoskeleton and cell adhesions. Most of the 20 human Rho GTPases cycle between a GTP-bound active form and a GDP-bound inactive form, although RhoH and Rnd proteins are constitutively GTP-bound. Rho GTPases are activated in response to a wide variety of extracellular cues. Rho GTPases are regulated by and activate a complex network of proteins, including protein kinases, which lead to changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and cell contractility. I will describe results of RNAi screens we have carried out of Rho GTPase network components, including new links between Rho family members and protein kinases.
INI 1
16:30 to 17:00 Group Discussion INI 1
Friday 17th July 2015
09:00 to 10:15 Robert Nürnberg (Imperial College London)
Parametric finite element methods for two-phase flow and dynamic biomembranes
In this talk I will discuss recent advances in the numerical analysis of front-tracking methods for two moving interface problems. In the first part of the talk I will concentrate on a parametric finite element approximation of two-phase flow. Here two fluids evolve in a domain, separated by an interface. Stress balance conditions on the interface lead to surface tension terms involving curvature. We employ a variational approximation of curvature that originates from the numerical
approximation of geometric evolution equations, such as mean curvature flow. The arsising finite element approximation of two-phase flow can
be shown to be unconditionally stable.
In the second part of the talk, building on the concepts introduced in the first part, I will present a numerical method for the
approximation of dynamic biomembranes. Once again two phases of fluid are separated by an interface, but here the interface is endowed with
an elastic curvature energy. This models the properties of the lipid bilayer structure of the biomembrane's cell walls. Combining ideas on
the numerical approximation of Willmore flow, two-phase flow and  surface PDEs on an evolving manifold we are able to introduce a stable
parametric finite element method for the evolution of biomembranes.

Suggested review articles:
Deckelnick, K., Dziuk, G., and Elliott, C. M. (2005). Computation of geometric partial differential equations and mean curvature flow.
Acta Numer., 14, 139--232.
Seifert, U. (1997). Configurations of fluid membranes and vesicles.Adv. Phys., 46, 13--137.
INI 1
10:15 to 10:45 Morning Coffee
10:45 to 12:00 Alain Goriely (University of Oxford)
A brief review of the mathematics and mechanics of biological membranes, plates, and shell
Many biological structures, such as cellular walls, epithelial sheet, pollen tubes, and seashells can be modelled as two-dimensional objects. That is, these structures have a transverse length scale much smaller than the other two typical length scales. In this general lecture, I will review the basic aspects of the mathematics and mechanics of surfaces. I will start by reviewing the differential geometry of surface, then consider classical models for lipid bilayers and their use in cellular biology. I will describe how to model bio-elastic membranes, plates, and shells and how to extend classical models to include active and growth processes. I will apply these ideas to microbial filaments, bleb formation, and to urchin and seashell growth.
INI 1
12:00 to 12:30 Group Discussion INI 1
12:30 to 13:30 Lunch at Wolfson Court
13:30 to 14:45 Ana-Sunčana Smith (Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg)
Membrane dynamics
INI 1
14:45 to 15:15 Afternoon Tea
15:15 to 16:30 Michael Kozlov (Tel Aviv University)
Mechanisms shaping endoplasmic reticulum
Membranes of intracellular organelles and transport intermediates acquire shapes with large curvatures and complex morphologies, and undergo persistent remodeling by fission and fusion. We suggest a unifying mechanistic framework for understanding how specialized peripheral membrane proteins control the intracellular membrane curvature and dynamics, and address the effects of several specific proteins. Our consideration is based on two major mechanisms by which proteins shape membranes: shallow insertion into the membrane matrix of amphipathic or hydrophobic protein domains, and membrane attachment to the strongly curved and rigid faces of hydrophilic protein scaffolds. We considering the scaffolding mechanism, by model computationally the shaping of endoplasmic reticulum (ER ) membranes by oligomers of reticulon and DP1/Yop1 family proteins. We demonstrate that membrane molding by these proteins into nearly half-cylindrical shapes underlies generation of the whole plethora of complex morphologies observed to date in ER of different cells, which include ER tubules, sheets, inter-tubular three-way junctions, inter-sheet helicoidal connections and sheet fenestrations.
INI 1
16:30 to 17:00 Group Discussion INI 1
Monday 20th July 2015
09:00 to 10:15 Philip Maini (University of Oxford)
Case studies in modelling pattern formation
The generation of spatial pattern formation is still a largely unresolved problem in biology. Here we will review some classical models for pattern formation, including the Turing reaction diffusion model, models for chemotaxis, in the context of biological applications.
INI 1
10:15 to 10:45 Morning Coffee
10:45 to 12:00 Analysis of stochastic multiscale systems: derivation of coarse-grained models, calculation of effective coefficients and data driven approaches. INI 1
12:00 to 12:30 Group Discussion INI 1
12:30 to 13:30 Lunch at Wolfson Court
13:30 to 14:45 Erik Sahai
Tumor cell migration
INI 1
14:45 to 15:15 Afternoon Tea
15:15 to 16:30 Nienke Vrisekoop (Universiteit Utrecht)
Intravital microscopy of the immune system
INI 1
16:30 to 17:00 Group Discussion INI 1
Tuesday 21st July 2015
09:00 to 10:15 Dagmar Iber (ETH Zürich)
From networks to functions - computational models of Organogenesis
INI 1
10:15 to 10:45 Morning Coffee
10:45 to 12:00 David Umulis (Purdue University)
Quantitative imaging and mathematical modeling reveals new mechanisms for BMP-mediated patterning of zebrafish blastula embryos
INI 1
12:00 to 12:30 Group Discussion INI 1
12:30 to 13:30 Lunch at Wolfson Court
13:30 to 14:45 Sebastian Aland (Technische Universität Dresden)
Phase field models for multiphase flow with applications to cell motility
Co-authors: Wieland Marth (TU Dresden, Germany), Axel Voigt (TU Dresden, Germany) Many processes in biological cells can be described as multiphase flow systems. In this lecture I will introduce the diffuse interface model for such systems. One advantage is the simple coupling to additional physical effects. In particular, I will show how to account for species concentrations in the bulk phases and on the interface. The approach will be illustrated by numerical simulation of endocytosis and cell motility.
INI 1
14:45 to 15:15 Afternoon Tea
15:15 to 16:30 Perihan Nalbant (Universität Duisburg-Essen)
TBA
INI 1
16:30 to 17:00 Group Discussion INI 1
Wednesday 22nd July 2015
09:00 to 10:15 Charles Elliott (University of Warwick)
PDEs on evolving domains
Recently with Aphonse and Stinner we have presented an abstract framework for treating the theory of well- posedness of solutions to abstract parabolic partial differential equations on evolving Hilbert spaces. This theory is applicable to variational for- mulations of PDEs on evolving spatial domains including moving hyper- surfaces. We formulate an appropriate time derivative on evolving spaces called the material derivative and define a weak material derivative in analogy with the usual time derivative in fixed domain problems; our set- ting is abstract and not restricted to evolving domains or surfaces. Then we show well-posedness to a certain class of parabolic PDEs under some assumptions on the parabolic operator and the data. Specifically, we study in turn a surface heat equation, an equation posed on a bulk domain, a novel coupled bulk-surface system and an equation with a dynamic boundary condition. In this talk we give some background to applications in cell biology. We describe how the theory may be used in the development and numerical analysis of evolving surface finite element methods and give some computational examples involving the coupling of surface evolution to processes on the surface. We indicate how this approach may work for PDEs on general evolving domains. We will discuss briefly surface finite elements for finding surfaces in the context of models for biomembranes. We will indicate how other approaches might be applicable.

Background material: K. P. Deckelnick, G. Dziuk and C. M. Elliott Computation of Geometric PDEs and Mean Curvature Flow Acta Numerica (2005) 139–232
G. Dziuk and C. M. Elliott Finite element methods for surface partial differential equations Acta Numerica (2013) 289–396

See:-https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?hl=en&user=uViOnZ4AAAAJ&view_op=list_works&sortby=pubdate
INI 1
10:15 to 10:45 Morning Coffee
10:45 to 12:00 James Glazier (Indiana University)
Making Virtual-Tissue Modeling an Integral Tool in Biology
INI 1
12:00 to 12:30 Group Discussion INI 1
12:30 to 13:30 Lunch at Wolfson Court
13:30 to 14:45 Masayasu Mimura (Meiji University)
Colonial patterns formed by chemotactic bacteria E. coli
Over the past ten years, our understanding of how spatio-temporal patterns in far from equilibrium systems has been gradually deepened. Collaborative research of experimental and theoretical works have discovered the mechanism how complex patterns were generated in biological systems. It is emphasized that genetics does not always reveal the occurrence of such patterns and even simple systems may generate ordered as well as chaotic patterns in a self-organized way. As an example, Budrene and Berg observed that chemotactic bacteria of E. coli produce regulated as well as complex colonial patterns., depending on initial concentration of nutrients, In particular, flower-like patterns called “chevron pattern” is interesting ([1], [2]). Budrene and Berg concluded that such patterns are produced in a self-organized way. Motivated by their conclusion, we propose a macroscopic PDE model and Budrene and Berg understand the mechanism behind such colonial patterns ([3], [4], [5]).

Keywords: colonial pattern formation, chemotactic mobility, self-organization.

REFERENCES [1] Budrene E. O and Berg, H. C.: Complex patterns formed by motile cells of Escherichia coli., Nature 349 pp.630~633 (1991) [2] Budrene E. O and Berg, H. C.: Dynamics of formation of symmetrical patterns by chemotactic bacteria, Nature 376 pp. 49~53 (1995 [3] Aotani A., Mimura M. and Mollee T.: A model-aided understanding of spot pattern formation in chemotactic E. coli colonies, Japan J. Industrial and Applied Mathematics, 27, 5-22 (2010) [4] Celinski, R., Hilhorst D., Karch G. and Mimura M.: Mathematical properties of solutions to the model of formation of chemotactic E. coli. colonies, manuscript [5] Aotani A. and Mimura M.: Chevron patterns in chemotactic E. coli. colonies, in preparation
INI 1
14:45 to 15:15 Afternoon Tea
15:15 to 15:45 Group Discussion INI 1
Thursday 23rd July 2015
09:00 to 10:15 Mark Chaplain (University of St Andrews)
Multiscale modelling of cancer growth and treatment
INI 1
10:15 to 10:45 Morning Coffee
10:45 to 12:00 John King (University of Nottingham)
Multiphase modelling of cells and tissues
INI 1
12:00 to 12:30 Group Discussion INI 1
12:30 to 13:30 Lunch at Wolfson Court
13:30 to 14:45 Zeno von Guttenberg (ibidi GmbH)
Cell Migration Assays
The movement of cells between different points induced by certain events, biological signals or environmental inputs is called cell migration. This process is essential for a large number of physiological processes like wound healing and immune response, but also for a variety of diseases. Investigating for instance the migration and invasion of tumor and stromal cells to understand the basic principles, gives valuable input for novel approaches in the diagnosis of cancer, the prognosis and the development of new drugs. Key features of migration assays are the easy application, the reproducibility and the significance of the results. An overview is given about different established in vitro assay types which can be used to evaluate cell migration. The assays are divided in methods for kinetic analysis and for endpoint measurements and also in 2D and 3D migration. Problems and limitations are discussed and the respective read out as well as the mathematical interpretation is presented.
INI 1
14:45 to 15:15 Afternoon Tea
15:15 to 16:30 Christoph Möhl (Deutsches Zentrum für Neurodegenerative Erkrankungen (DZNE))
Quantitative imaging of migrating cells in vitro and in living tissues
During the past 20 years, imaging of specific proteins in living biological systems has become one of the most powerful techniques to investigate processes of life on the micro scale. By optical imaging of genetically encoded fluorescent reporters, the localization and dynamics of functional proteins can directly be observed in artificial cell culture systems as well as in whole animals. For studying the process of cell migration specific parts of the cytoskeleton (e.g. actin bundles or substrate adhesion sites) can be recorded in time-lapse movies. However, due to technical limitations it is not feasible to observe multiple target structures simultaneously in one experiment. Thus, the interplay of multiple cellular components such as the contractile actin-myosin network and force-transducing adhesion sites is difficult to investigate. I will discuss opportunities and limitations of optical imaging for studying cell migration by examples from my work on single cell migration as well as collective cell migration during embryonic development. Amongst others, I will present methods how to quantify cellular dynamics with image processing methods and how to integrate heterogeneous data from multiple independent observations to one consistent picture.
INI 1
16:30 to 17:00 Group Discussion INI 1
Friday 24th July 2015
09:00 to 10:15 Alf Gerisch (Technische Universität Darmstadt)
Sensitivity analysis and quantification of uncertainty
In this lecture we will review methods for the local and global sensitivity analysis as well as a stochastic collocation approach for the quantification of uncertainty. These techniques can provide additional insight into given models as well as guide future research. However, they also come with their own computational challenges, which will be discussed. The methods are illustrated using some instructive examples from pattern formation.
INI 1
10:15 to 10:45 Morning Coffee
10:45 to 12:00 John Lowengrub (University of California, Irvine)
Computational methods for tissue and tumor growth
INI 1
12:00 to 12:30 Group Discussion INI 1
12:30 to 13:30 Lunch at Wolfson Court
13:30 to 14:45 Leif Dehmelt
Biomolecular interaction assays
INI 1
14:45 to 15:15 Afternoon Tea
15:15 to 16:30 Dorit Merhof (RWTH Aachen University)
Image analysis for biomedical applications - methods and software solutions
In this talk, an insight into today’s image analysis needs of biological and medical research groups and core facilities is provided based on the results of a survey conducted within German BioImaging. Furthermore, a survey of methods for biomedical image processing is provided, as well as an overview of existing software solutions.
INI 1
16:30 to 17:00 Group Discussion INI 1
University of Cambridge Research Councils UK
    Clay Mathematics Institute London Mathematical Society NM Rothschild and Sons