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Timetable (GCSW01)

Tutorial workshop

Monday 8th July 2019 to Friday 12th July 2019

Monday 8th July 2019
09:20 to 09:50 Registration
09:50 to 10:00 Welcome from Christie Marr (INI Deputy Director)
10:00 to 11:00 Hans Munthe-Kaas (Universitetet i Bergen)
Why B-series, rooted trees, and free algebras? - 1
"We regard Butcher’s work on the classification of numerical integration methods as an impressive example that concrete problem-oriented work can lead to far-reaching conceptual results”. This quote by Alain Connes summarises nicely the mathematical depth and scope of the theory of Butcher's B-series. The aim of this joined lecture is to answer the question posed in the title by drawing a line from B-series to those far-reaching conceptional results they originated. Unfolding the precise mathematical picture underlying B-series requires a combination of different perspectives and tools from geometry (connections); analysis (generalisations of Taylor expansions), algebra (pre-/post-Lie and Hopf algebras) and combinatorics (free algebras on rooted trees). This summarises also the scope of these lectures.   In the first lecture we will outline the geometric foundations of B-series, and their cousins Lie-Butcher series. The latter is adapted to studying differential equations on manifolds. The theory of connections and parallel transport will be explained. In the second and third lectures we discuss the algebraic and combinatorial structures arising from the study of invariant connections. Rooted trees play a particular role here as they provide optimal index sets for the terms in Taylor series and generalisations thereof. The final lecture will discuss various applications of the theory in the numerical analysis of integration schemes.
INI 1
11:00 to 11:30 Morning Coffee
11:30 to 12:30 Charlie Elliott (University of Warwick)
tba - 1
INI 1
12:30 to 14:00 Lunch at Murray Edwards College
14:00 to 15:00 Elizabeth Mansfield (University of Kent)
tba - 1
INI 1
15:00 to 16:00 Christopher Budd (University of Bath)
tba - 1
INI 1
16:00 to 16:30 Afternoon Tea
16:30 to 17:30 Paola Francesca Antonietti (Politecnico di Milano)
High-order Discontinuous Galerkin methods on polytopic grids for the numerical modelling of earthquake ground motion
A number of challenging geophysical applications requires a flexible representation of the geometry and an accurate approximation of the solution field. Paradigmatic examples include seismic wave propagation and fractured reservoir simulations. The main challenges are i) the complexity of the physical domain, due to the presence of localized geological irregularities, alluvial basins, faults and fractures; ii) the heterogeneities in the medium, with significant and sharp contrasts; and iii) the coexistence of different physical models. The discontinuous Galerkin FEM on polytopic grids (PolyDG) possesses the built-in flexibility to naturally accommodate both polytopic meshes and high-order approximations in any space dimension. In this talk I will discuss recent advances in the development and analysis of high-order PolyDG methods for the numerical approximation of seismic wave propagation phenomena. I will analyse the stability and the theoretical properties of the scheme and present some simulations of real large-scale seismic events in three-dimensional complex media.
INI 1
17:30 to 18:30 Welcome Wine Reception at INI
Tuesday 9th July 2019
09:00 to 10:00 Douglas Arnold (University of Minnesota)
tba - 1
INI 1
10:00 to 11:00 Elizabeth Mansfield (University of Kent)
tba - 2
INI 1
11:00 to 11:30 Morning Coffee
11:30 to 12:30 Kurusch Ebrahimi-Fard (Norwegian University of Science and Technology)
Why B-series, rooted trees, and free algebras? - 2
"We regard Butcher’s work on the classification of numerical integration methods as an impressive example that concrete problem-oriented work can lead to far-reaching conceptual results”. This quote by Alain Connes summarises nicely the mathematical depth and scope of the theory of Butcher's B-series. The aim of this joined lecture is to answer the question posed in the title by drawing a line from B-series to those far-reaching conceptional results they originated. Unfolding the precise mathematical picture underlying B-series requires a combination of different perspectives and tools from geometry (connections); analysis (generalisations of Taylor expansions), algebra (pre-/post-Lie and Hopf algebras) and combinatorics (free algebras on rooted trees). This summarises also the scope of these lectures.   In the first lecture we will outline the geometric foundations of B-series, and their cousins Lie-Butcher series. The latter is adapted to studying differential equations on manifolds. The theory of connections and parallel transport will be explained. In the second and third lectures we discuss the algebraic and combinatorial structures arising from the study of invariant connections. Rooted trees play a particular role here as they provide optimal index sets for the terms in Taylor series and generalisations thereof. The final lecture will discuss various applications of the theory in the numerical analysis of integration schemes.
INI 1
12:30 to 14:00 Lunch at Murray Edwards College
14:00 to 15:00 Charlie Elliott (University of Warwick)
tba - 2
INI 1
15:00 to 16:00 Christian Lubich (Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen)
Variational Gaussian wave packets revisited
The talk reviews Gaussian wave packets that evolve according to the Dirac-Frenkel time-dependent variational principle for the semi-classically scaled Schr\"odinger equation. Old and new results on the approximation to the wave function are given, in particular an $L^2$ error bound that goes back to Hagedorn (1980) in a non-variational setting, and a new error bound for averages of observables with a Weyl symbol, which shows the double approximation order in the semi-classical scaling parameter in comparison with the norm estimate.

The variational equations of motion in Hagedorn's parametrization of the Gaussian are presented. They show a perfect quantum-classical correspondence and allow us to read off directly that the Ehrenfest time is determined by the Lyapunov exponent of the classical equations of motion.

A variational splitting integrator is formulated and its remarkable conservation and approximation properties are discussed. A new result shows that the integrator approximates averages of observables with the full order in the time stepsize, with an error constant that is uniform in the semiclassical parameter.

The material presented here for variational Gaussians is part of an Acta Numerica review article on computational methods for quantum dynamics in the semi-classical regime, which is currently in preparation in joint work with Caroline Lasser.

INI 1
16:00 to 17:30 Poster session and Afternoon tea
Wednesday 10th July 2019
09:00 to 10:00 Christopher Budd (University of Bath)
tba - 2
INI 1
10:00 to 11:00 Douglas Arnold (University of Minnesota)
tba - 2
INI 1
11:00 to 11:30 Morning Coffee
11:30 to 12:30 Charlie Elliott (University of Warwick)
tba - 3
INI 1
12:30 to 14:00 Lunch at Murray Edwards College
14:00 to 17:00 Free afternoon
19:30 to 22:00 Formal Dinner at Trinity College


LOCATION
Trinity College, Cambridge CB2 1TQ

DRESS CODE
Smart casual

MENU

Starter
Salad of Madgett’s Duck Confit - Hazelnuts, Gésiers, Duck Liver Mousse, Rhubarb and Sweet Pickled Shallot
Cream of Watercress Soup - Grain Mustard Sabayon and Cheddar Straw Pastry Crumb  (V)  
Main
Cambridgeshire Lamb LoinSamphire Grass, Parmesan and Artichoke Risotto and Mustard Glazed Crôutons
Open Lasagne, Balsamic Shallots, Roasted Yellow Courgette, Ricotta and Confit Cherry Tomato (V)  
Pudding
Gooseberry Fool - Raisin Biscuits and Butterscotch





Thursday 11th July 2019
09:00 to 10:00 Charlie Elliott (University of Warwick)
tba - 4
INI 1
10:00 to 11:00 Beth Wingate (University of Exeter)
tba
INI 1
11:00 to 11:30 Morning Coffee
11:30 to 12:30 Douglas Arnold (University of Minnesota)
tba - 3
INI 1
12:30 to 14:00 Lunch at Murray Edwards College
14:00 to 15:00 Kurusch Ebrahimi-Fard (Norwegian University of Science and Technology)
Why B-series, rooted trees, and free algebras? - 3
"We regard Butcher’s work on the classification of numerical integration methods as an impressive example that concrete problem-oriented work can lead to far-reaching conceptual results”. This quote by Alain Connes summarises nicely the mathematical depth and scope of the theory of Butcher's B-series. The aim of this joined lecture is to answer the question posed in the title by drawing a line from B-series to those far-reaching conceptional results they originated. Unfolding the precise mathematical picture underlying B-series requires a combination of different perspectives and tools from geometry (connections); analysis (generalisations of Taylor expansions), algebra (pre-/post-Lie and Hopf algebras) and combinatorics (free algebras on rooted trees). This summarises also the scope of these lectures.   In the first lecture we will outline the geometric foundations of B-series, and their cousins Lie-Butcher series. The latter is adapted to studying differential equations on manifolds. The theory of connections and parallel transport will be explained. In the second and third lectures we discuss the algebraic and combinatorial structures arising from the study of invariant connections. Rooted trees play a particular role here as they provide optimal index sets for the terms in Taylor series and generalisations thereof. The final lecture will discuss various applications of the theory in the numerical analysis of integration schemes.
INI 1
15:00 to 16:00 Elizabeth Mansfield (University of Kent)
tba - 3
INI 1
16:00 to 16:30 Afternoon Tea
16:30 to 17:30 Panel INI 1
Friday 12th July 2019
09:00 to 10:00 Reinout Quispel (La Trobe University)
Discrete Darboux polynomials and the preservation of measure and integrals of ordinary differential equations
Preservation of phase space volume (or more generally measure), first integrals (such as energy), and second integrals have been important topics in geometric numerical integration for more than a decade, and methods have been developed to preserve each of these properties separately. Preserving two or more geometric properties simultaneously, however, has often been difficult, if not impossible. Then it was discovered that Kahan’s ‘unconventional’ method seems to perform well in many cases [1]. Kahan himself, however, wrote: “I have used these unconventional methods for 24 years without quite understanding why they work so well as they do, when they work.” The first approximation to such an understanding in computational terms was: Kahan’s method works so well because
1.         It is very successful at preserving multiple quantities simultaneously, eg modified energy and modified measure.
2.         It is linearly implicit
3.         It is the restriction of a Runge-Kutta method
However, point 1 above raises a further obvious question: Why does Kahan’s method preserve both certain (modified) first integrals and certain (modified) measures? In this talk we invoke Darboux polynomials to try and answer this question. The method of Darboux polynomials (DPs) for ODEs was introduced by Darboux to detect rational integrals. Very recently we have advocated the use of DPs for discrete systems [2,3]. DPs provide a unified theory for the preservation of polynomial measures and second integrals, as well as rational first integrals. In this new perspective the answer we propose to the above question is: Kahan’s method works so well because it is good at preserving (modified) Darboux polynomials. If time permits we may discuss extensions to polarization methods.  

[1] Petrera et al, Regular and Chaotic Dynamics 16 (2011), 245–289.
[2] Celledoni et al, arxiv:1902.04685.
[3] Celledoni et al, arxiv:1902.04715.
INI 1
10:00 to 10:30 James Jackaman (Memorial University of Newfoundland)
Lie symmetry preserving finite element methods
Through the mathematical construction of finite element methods, the “standard” finite element method will often preserve the underlying symmetry of a given differential equation. However, this is not always the case, and while historically much attention has been paid to the preserving of conserved quantities the preservation of Lie symmetries is an open problem. We introduce a methodology for the design of arbitrary order finite element methods which preserve the underlying Lie symmetries through an equivariant moving frames based invariantization procedure.
INI 1
10:30 to 11:00 Candan Güdücü (Technische Universität Berlin)
Port-Hamiltonian Systems
The framework of port-Hamiltonian systems (PH systems) combines both the Hamiltonian approach and the network approach, by associating with the interconnection structure of the network model a geometric structure given by a Dirac structure. Furthermore, port-Hamiltonian systems theory is ideally suited for a systematic mathematical treatment of multi-physics systems by using energy and power as the lingua franca between different physical domains. A numerical method that exploits the structure of PH systems by using additive splitting methods has been derived. The results from a series
of parametrized numerical experiments are presented to show the numerical stability and behavior of the solution depending on the parameters.
INI 1
11:00 to 11:30 Morning Coffee
11:30 to 12:30 Christopher Budd (University of Bath)
tba - 3
INI 1
12:30 to 14:00 Lunch at Murray Edwards College
14:00 to 15:00 Douglas Arnold (University of Minnesota)
tba - 4
INI 1
15:00 to 16:00 Hans Munthe-Kaas (Universitetet i Bergen)
Why B-series, rooted trees, and free algebras? - 4
"We regard Butcher’s work on the classification of numerical integration methods as an impressive example that concrete problem-oriented work can lead to far-reaching conceptual results”. This quote by Alain Connes summarises nicely the mathematical depth and scope of the theory of Butcher's B-series. The aim of this joined lecture is to answer the question posed in the title by drawing a line from B-series to those far-reaching conceptional results they originated. Unfolding the precise mathematical picture underlying B-series requires a combination of different perspectives and tools from geometry (connections); analysis (generalisations of Taylor expansions), algebra (pre-/post-Lie and Hopf algebras) and combinatorics (free algebras on rooted trees). This summarises also the scope of these lectures.   In the first lecture we will outline the geometric foundations of B-series, and their cousins Lie-Butcher series. The latter is adapted to studying differential equations on manifolds. The theory of connections and parallel transport will be explained. In the second and third lectures we discuss the algebraic and combinatorial structures arising from the study of invariant connections. Rooted trees play a particular role here as they provide optimal index sets for the terms in Taylor series and generalisations thereof. The final lecture will discuss various applications of the theory in the numerical analysis of integration schemes.
INI 1
University of Cambridge Research Councils UK
    Clay Mathematics Institute London Mathematical Society NM Rothschild and Sons