Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences

Infectious Disease Dynamics

19 – 23 August 2013

Organisers: Chris Dye (WHO), John Edmunds (LSHTM), Julia Gog (Cambridge), Bryan Grenfell (Princeton), Hans Heesterbeek (Utrecht), Valerie Isham (University College London) and Denis Mollison (Heriot-Watt)

in association with the Newton Institute programme Infectious Disease Dynamics
(19 August - 13 September 2013)


Apply (deadline 30 April 2013) | Programme | Participants | Poster Session | Group Photograph

Contents

Theme | Fees | Accommodation | Meals


Theme

Diagram of the spread of infection on a network

In 2013, it is 20 years since a six-month programme on Epidemic Models was held at the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences in Cambridge, UK. This programme was very influential in shaping the research field of infectious disease dynamics from its mostly mathematical initial development in the nineteen-seventies and eighties to its current breadth and depth, dealing with important veterinary and human infections.

In the last 20 years, the field has changed profoundly in many ways: it has attracted many researchers, who come from a very large range of disciplines, most taking a biological question rather than a methodological question as the starting point for their research; the use of models to inform (veterinary and human public) health policy has matured; the integration with data, and the required methodology, has become much stronger; sources of heterogeneity, previously often neglected, or unrecognised as important, have become much richer, partly as a result of the availability of new data sources and profound advances in data gathering techniques, computing techniques and power; many new infectious agents have appeared making scientific efforts in understanding infectious disease dynamics even more relevant to the real world. Both key veterinary and human infections were instrumental in shaping the field, it is expected that notably zoonotic infections will move the field further in the next decades.

We aim to bring together 100 scientists in our field, mostly on an invitation basis, across a wide range of interests, disciplines and ages, to define what these changes mean for the future of the field and to establish a research agenda for the coming decade. In addition, we celebrate the twentieth anniversary of the instrumental initial Newton programme.

Given the nature of the meeting, we are directly inviting the speakers (balancing the participants from the original 1993 meeting, as well as later generations of researchers) and asking them specifically to address the broad topics that we have identified. The workshop will run for five days, ending after lunch on Friday 23 August. There will be one and a half days devoted to painting 20 years of post-Newton developments, one and a half days devoted to topics of great importance for the future of the field, and two half days devoted to public health needs with respect to our collective insight and methodology. We have chosen a form for the workshop that maximises the opportunity for discussion.

The nature of the workshop is that speakers will be addressing their themes broadly, instead of talking about their own work in this area. For that reason, there will, as part of the workshop, be the possibility to present and discuss posters on more specific focussed new research.

Although attendance is mostly by invitation, there are a small number of places available for young scientists in the field of infectious disease dynamics, with preference for scientists from outside Europe and the USA. The organising committee will decide which applicants can come to the meeting, should more people apply than places exist.

Speakers

Invited speakers will include:

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Fees

Registration Only

The Registration Package includes admission to all seminars, lunches and refreshments on the days that lectures take place (Monday – Friday each week), wine reception and conference dinner, but does not include other meals or accommodation.

Registration and Accommodation

The Accommodation Package includes a registration fee, bed and breakfast accommodation at Wolfson Court from the evening of Sunday 18 August 2013 to breakfast on Saturday 24 August 2013, together with lunches and refreshments during the days that lectures take place (Monday – Friday). The conference dinner is also included, but no other evening meals.

Conference Dinner Only

Participants on the Accommodation Package or Registration Package, including organisers and speakers, are automatically included in this event. For all remaining participants who would like to attend, such as Visiting Fellows, programme participants or their guests, the above charge will apply.



Accommodation

The Accommodation Package includes bed and breakfast accommodation at Wolfson Court. Accommodation is in single study bedrooms with shared bathroom facilities.

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Meals

Lunch

Lunch will be served at Wolfson Court in the Cafeteria from 12:30 to 13:30 on days that lectures take place.

Evening Meal

Participants are free to make their own arrangements for dinner.

Conference Dinner

The Conference Dinner date, time and venue will be confirmed shortly. Participants on the Accommodation Package or Registration Package, including organisers and speakers, are automatically included in this event. All remaining participants are encouraged to attend for the price of £50 each.


Venue Information

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Image from The New England Journal of Medicine, Gardy, 'Whole-Genome Sequencing and Social-Network Analysis of a Tuberculosis Outbreak', Volume 364, pp 730-9. Copyright ©2011 Massachusetts Medical Society. Reprinted with permission from Massachusetts Medical Society.



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