An Isaac Newton Institute Workshop

Entanglement and Transfer of Quantum Information

Endohedral fullerenes for electron-spin-based quantum computing

Authors: Arzhang Ardavan (Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU, UK), John Morton (Department of Materials, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH, UK), David Britz (Department of Materials, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH, UK), Andrei Khlobystov (Department of Materials, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH, UK), Kyriakos Porfyrakis (Department of Materials, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH, UK), Alexei Tyryshkin (Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA), Stephen Lyon (Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA), G. Andrew D. Briggs (Department of Materials, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH, UK)

Abstract

A nitrogen atom encapsulated in a C60 buckyball, N@C60, carries an electron magnetic moment that is well isolated from the environment. It exhibits extremely long spin decoherence times, comparable with the longest measured in any solid state system. We explain the potential advantages of exploiting endohedral fullerenes as qubits and describe approaches to employing N@C60 and related molecules in multi-qubit structures. Using pulsed electron spin resonance we examine the capability of existing spectrometers to perform high-fidelity single-qubit unitary transformations, and find that the current state of the art is adequate for simple quantum computations.