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2013: Colva Roney-Dougal

2012: Kjartan Poskitt

2011: Prof Reidun Twarock

2008: Prof David Banks

2007: Prof Raymond Goldstein

2006: Dr Robert Hunt

2005: Dr Robert Hunt

2004: Prof Sir John Kingman

2003: Dr Robert Hunt

2002: Prof Michael Green


Colva Roney-Dougal

Senior Lecturer in Pure Mathematics at the University of St Andrews

Title:
Party Hard! The Maths of Connections

Date:
Saturday 23 March 2013

Time:
11.00-12.00

Venue:
Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Science
20 Clarkson Road
Cambridge
CB3 OEH

How many guests need to come to a party, to guarantee that at least five of them either all know each other or are mutual strangers? Join Dr Colva Roney-Dougal and see some unexpected applications of the maths behind this still-unsolved problem, from modelling flu epidemics to galaxy formation.

Suitable for ages 14+

Watch the recording of the talk


Kjartan Poskitt

Title:
Murderous Maths

Date:
Saturday 24 March 2012

Time:
14.00-15.00

Venue:
Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Science
20 Clarkson Road
Cambridge
CB3 OEH

An entertaining, interactive and hilarious look at the wonderful world of maths.

Ever wondered how to make your birthday twice as long or how to cut something in half but keep it in one piece? Join Kjartan Poskitt, author of the acclaimed "Murderous Maths" series for an hour of hilarious mathematical fun with flexagons, magic squares, strange number facts, knots, tricks, codes, amazing number predictions and much more. Lots of audience participation required!

Suitable for Ages 8+

Watch the recording of the talk


Prof Reidun Twarock

Professor of Mathematical Biology at the University of York

Title:
Viruses under the Mathematical Microscope: Deciphering the Code of Viral Geometry

Date:
Saturday 26 March 2011

Time:
12.30-13.00

Venue:
Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Science
20 Clarkson Road
Cambridge
CB3 OEH

Viruses, such as hepatitis and the common cold, have highly ordered protein containers that encapsulate the viral genomic material. They act as Trojan horses, transporting the genomic material inside a cell to hijack the cellular mechanism and produce new viruses. Insights in how these capsids are organised are key to understanding how viruses work and how they can be defeated. In this talk, Reidun Twarock will explore virus architecture under the mathematical microscope. We will show that symmetry plays a key role for virus structure, and that mathematical tools similar to those used in the study of Penrose tilings provide novel insights that shed new light on viral evolution and on how viruses infect their hosts.

Watch the recording of the talk


Prof David Banks

Professor of Statistics at Duke University

Title:
Discovery In High Dimensions

Date:
Saturday 15 March 2008

Time:
11.00-12.00

Venue:
Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Science
20 Clarkson Road
Cambridge
CB3 OEH

Scientists collect data about genes, stars, and human behavior. Corporations collect data about purchases and products. The government collects data about people and policies. Professor Banks will discuss how these data contain important hidden structure, and the new kinds of statistical procedures that are able to discover it.

Suitable for ages 14+

Watch the recording of the talk


Prof Raymond Goldstein

Schlumberger Professor of Complex Physical Systems at Cambridge University

Title:
How the Stalactite got its shape

Date:
Saturday 24 March 2007

Time:
11.00-11.45

Venue:
Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Science
20 Clarkson Road
Cambridge
CB3 OEH

Discussion on his group's recent work - both experimental and theoretical - on the unusual shapes into which stalactites naturally grow.


Dr Robert Hunt

Deputy Director, Isaac Newton Institute

Title:
Maths at Work in the Real World

Date:
Saturday 25 March 2006

Time:
12.00-13.00

Venue:
Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Science
20 Clarkson Road
Cambridge
CB3 OEH

Explain how mathematics, which can sometimes seem abstract and irrelevant, is at work in our everyday lives. All around us, from tools which we use on a daily basis (such as mobile phones) through to scientific advances in medicine (such as PET scanners), are examples of how high-powered mathematics is responsible for things that we take for granted in the modern world. And maths turns up in nature in the most unexpected ways!

The talk will take a light-hearted tour around the usefulness of maths in the real world and will try to explain what the point of studying maths is anyway; concluding with a challenge to find any aspect of life, the world or the Universe which is not intimately related to maths. The talk will definitely be aimed at non-experts.


Dr Robert Hunt

Deputy Director, Isaac Newton Institute

Title:
Mathematics Past, Present and Beyond

Date:
Saturday 19 March 2005

Time:
11.00-12.00

Venue:
Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Science
20 Clarkson Road
Cambridge
CB3 OEH

Dr Robert Hunt takes us on a whistle stop journey through mathematical ideas from the past to the present and beyond.
Find out how mathematics has shaped our lives so far and how it will continue to do so in the future.


Professor Sir John Kingman

Director, Isaac Newton Institute

Title:
Chance and Probability

Date:
Saturday 20 March 2004

Time:
11.00-12.00

Venue:
Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Science
20 Clarkson Road
Cambridge
CB3 OEH

Professor Sir John Kingman will explain how even the most unpredictable things in the world can be studied mathematically. Maths often deals with things that change in a very predictable way, like the planets going round the sun. But much in life is quite unpredictable: the weather, the stock market, football results and so on. Can maths say anything about these? The answer lies in ideas of probability, an old but rapidly developing branch of mathematics. You will not learn to predict the future, but you may be able to move the odds in your favour.


Dr Robert Hunt

Deputy Director, Isaac Newton Institute

Title:
Maths at Work in the Real World

Date:
Saturday 22 March 2003

Time:
16.00-17.00

Venue:
Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Science
20 Clarkson Road
Cambridge
CB3 OEH

Dr Hunt will explain how mathematics, which can sometimes seem abstract and irrelevant, is at work in our everyday lives. All around us, from tools which we use on a daily basis (such as mobile phones) through to scientific advances in medicine (such as PET scanners), are examples of how high-powered mathematics is responsible for things that we take for granted in the modern world. And maths turns up in nature in the most unexpected ways! The talk will take a light-hearted tour around the usefulness of maths in the real world and will try to explain what the point of studying maths is anyway; concluding with a challenge to find any aspect of life, the world or the Universe which is not intimately related to maths. The talk will definitely be aimed at non-experts.

Suitable for ages 14+


Prof Michael Green

Title:
String Theory - Tying it all up

Date:
Saturday 23 March 2002

Time:
11.00-12.00

Venue:
Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Science
20 Clarkson Road
Cambridge
CB3 OEH

This talk will describe the way in which string theory unifies the laws of physics and is radically altering our ideas about the nature of the universe at the smallest and largest distance scales.

Suitable for ages 16+


University of Cambridge Research Councils UK
    Clay Mathematics Institute The Leverhulme Trust London Mathematical Society Microsoft Research NM Rothschild and Sons